Karman

Trivia n°8: Theorical Math

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Night Flayer in Royal Revolt 2

 

1  Why is the symbol “=” used to express equality?

Because they are two parallel lines of equal length.


2  Where did the sexagesimal system come from?

It came from the Sumerians.


3  Who made the first set of rules to deal with negative numbers and when?

Liu Hui made rules for adding and subtracting negative numbers in the 3rd century.


4  Approximately how many proofs are there for the Pythagorean Theorem?

There are infinite proofs.


5  How many years did it take the world to proof Fermat’s Last Theorem? Specify the years and who finally reached the proof.

Fermat's Last Theorem was developed in 1637, and Sir Andrew John Wiles finally published a correct proof in 1995.  Therefore, it took 358 years to prove, and Sir Andrew John Wiles was the mathematician who did so.


6  A very curious question, explain why a pizza’s volume can be calculated with the following formula: Pizza. Explain each part and why it works.

Pi(z*z)a = volume of a pizza

where:

  z = radius of the pizza
  a = thickness of the pizza
  pi = π

Since volume of a cylinder is πr^2h


7  Who was the first one to fully document the binary system?

The binary system was devised by Gottfried Leibniz in 1679.


8  Where did the decimal system come from?

The decimal system was invented by Hindu mathematicians in India.


9  Where does the word “geometry” come from?

It comes from ancient Greek: Earth (geo) Measurement (metron).


10 When is the Pi Day and why?

March 14 since π=3.14 ...

 

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1. To avoid the tedious repetition of the words 'is equal to' a pair of parallel lines or Gemowe lines,of one length was used by ROBERT RECORDE for the first time. So, this symbol is used for simplicity and to avoid the repetition

2. Sexagesimal system originated with ancient Sumerians in the 3rd millennium BC. Later it was passed down to the ancient Babylonians. 

3.Indian mathematician BRAHMAGUPTA  made the first rule to deal with negative numbers in 7th century but it was only in the 19th century when a logical proof of this problem was given by de Morgan, Peacock and other mathematician. 

4. Approx 367 proves are there.(Thouth I'm not sure, there are different number given on different sites but  I have taken this from a maths Forum.)

Link- http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/62539.html

5. It  took 358 years to prove Fermat’s Last Theorem. It was finally proved by ANDREW WILES. Andrew wiles took almost 7 years to complete the prove. The correct prove was released in 19 Sep 1994 amd was published in May 1995.

6. Pizza is cylindrical in shape. So the formula for the volume of a cylinder is π*(square of the radius)*height. 

Now, Let

z = radius of the pizza

a = thickness or height of pizza

Then, 

Volume of pizza = π*(z*z)*a

Or,  vol. of pizza = Pi(zz)a =Pizza

 

So the Formula for volume of pizza is 'Pizza' itself.😀😀

7. Gottfried Leibniz was first person to fully document binary system. He did it in 17th Century. 

8.Decimal system come from my country 😍 'INDIA'. Hindu mathematician invented it between first and sixth centuries. 

9. The word Geometry comes from two ancient greek words 'Geo' and 'Metron', ' Geo' means Earth and 'metron' means measurement.

10. Pi day is celebrated on March 14. This day is celebrated on this particular date because March(3rd month) 14 symbolizes the first three significant digits of Pi(3.14). This day was first celebrated at large scale by Larry Shaw in 1988 at San Francisco exploration.

 

I have learnt a lot of new things searching the answers of these questions. I don't know I would have  learnt these things or not If I haven't come through these questions. So A LOT OF HEARTLY THANKS. 😍😀.

RR2

IGN:~ lord_pk

Edited by Karman
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Hello Karman! 

Nice gesture of you to host the trivia. Herby my answers:

 

1. It was explained by the inventor that nothing can be more equal than the pair of parallels of one length.
2. It originated with the ancient Sumerians.
3. Liu Hui established rules for negative numbers in the 3rd century.
4. There are an infinite number of proofs possible.
5. Fermat´s last theorem was first conjectured in 1637. Andrew Wiles's proof of Fermat's Last Theorem was published in May 1995. So it took 358 years to proof this theorem.
6. If you have a pizza with radius "z" and thickness "a", its volume is Pi(z*z)a. It works because it has Pi in it, two the same characters to calculate the square of the radius and one more character for the thickness.
7. Gottfried Leibniz.
8. It came from the ten fingers of human hands.
9. The word Geometry comes from the Ancient Greek: geo- "earth", -metron "measurement".
10. March, 14: to be written as 3-14, which is Pi.

 

Game: RR2

IGN: Mas Miikael II

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Game :- Royal Revolt 2.

Ign :- Avi Ahir 1

1. It’s roots seem to be two arrows directing between two points, meaning this point equals the other point

2. Sexagesimal (base 60) is a numeral system with sixty as its base. It originated with the ancient Sumerians in the 3rd millennium BC, was passed down to the ancient Babylonians, and is still used—in a modified form—for measuring time, angles, and geographic coordinates.

3. Although the first set of rules for dealing with negative numbers was stated in the 7th century by the Indian mathematician Brahmagupta

4. 367 proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem

5.

1993 - 1637 = 356


Fermat’s last theorem was stated by Fermat in 1637. Many, many crucial steps towards the final proof took place through the 20th century, however Andrew Wiles was the person who brought it all together to solve it starting in 1986 and finally showing his work in 1993.


The Taniyama Shurima conjecture was what Andrew Wiles had proved, which connected two far away branches of mathematics. (around 1955)


Gerhard Frey connected the Taniyama-Shurima conjecture, showing that if one proves the first they would incidentally prove the latter in 1984.

6. mathematical volume of a pizza is pizza.  How does that work you say?  Well if z = radius of the pizza and a = the height then Π * radius2 * height = Pi * z * z * a = Pizza.

7. The modern binary number system was devised by Gottfried Leibniz in 1679 and appears in his article Explication de l'Arithmétique Binaire (published in 1703). Systems related to binary numbers have appeared earlier in multiple cultures including ancient Egypt, China, and India. Leibniz was specifically inspired by the Chinese I Ching

8. The decimal system was invented by Hindu mathematicians in India between the first and sixth centuries A.D. This system is sometimes also called the Hindu-Arabic numeral system because it was first introduced to Europeans by Arabs, who had acquired the system from the Hindus earlier.

9. Geometry comes from two Greek words, “ge” meaning “earth” and “metria” meaning “measuring.” The approach to Geometry developed by the Ancient Greeks has been used for over 2000 years as the basis of geometry.

10. Pi Day is celebrated on March 14th (3/14) around the world. Pi (Greek letter “”) is the symbol used in mathematics to represent a constant — the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter — which is approximately 3.14159. Pi has been calculated to over one trillion digits beyond its decimal point.

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1. It was explained by the inventor that nothing can be more equal than the pair of parallels of one length.
2. It originated with the ancient Sumerians.
3. Liu Hui established rules for negative numbers in the 3rd century.
4. There are an infinite number of proofs possible.
5. Fermat´s last theorem was first conjectured in 1637. Andrew Wiles's proof of Fermat's Last Theorem was published in May 1995. So it took 358 years to proof this theorem.
6. If you have a pizza with radius "z" and thickness "a", its volume is Pi(z*z)a. It works because it has Pi in it, two the same characters to calculate the square of the radius and one more character for the thickness.
7. Gottfried Leibniz.
8. It came from the ten fingers of human hands.
9. The word Geometry comes from the Ancient Greek: geo- "earth", -metron "measurement".
10. March, 14: to be written as 3-14, which is Pi.

Game: Royal revolt2

IGN: prince508

Edited by prince508
Forgot the game name

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1. It was explained by the inventor that nothing can be more equal than the pair of parallels of one length.
2. It originated with the ancient Sumerians.
3. Liu Hui established rules for negative numbers in the 3rd century.
4. There are an infinite number of proofs possible.
5. Fermat´s last theorem was first conjectured in 1637. Andrew Wiles's proof of Fermat's Last Theorem was published in May 1995. So it took 358 years to proof this theorem.
6. If you have a pizza with radius "z" and thickness "a", its volume is Pi(z*z)a. It works because it has Pi in it, two the same characters to calculate the square of the radius and one more character for the thickness.
7. Gottfried Leibniz.
8. It came from the ten fingers of human hands.
9. The word Geometry comes from the Ancient Greek: geo- "earth", -metron "measurement".
10. March, 14: to be written as 3-14, which is Pi.

Game: Royal Revolt 2

IGN: aj_i

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Hi, 

I play Royal Revolt 2 and my IGN is anirudh.234

Following are answers to the above questions:

1. It was explained by the inventor that nothing can be more equal than the pair of parallels of one length.
2. It originated with the ancient Sumerians.
3. Liu Hui established rules for negative numbers in the 3rd century.
4. There are an infinite number of proofs possible.
5. Fermat´s last theorem was first conjectured in 1637. Andrew Wiles's proof of Fermat's Last Theorem was published in May 1995. So it took 358 years to proof this theorem.
6. If you have a pizza with radius "z" and thickness "a", its volume is Pi(z*z)a. It works because it has Pi in it, two the same characters to calculate the square of the radius and one more character for the thickness.
7. Gottfried Leibniz.
8. It came from the ten fingers of human hands.
9. The word Geometry comes from the Ancient Greek: geo- "earth", -metron "measurement".
10. March, 14: to be written as 3-14, which is Pi.

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Game: Olympus Rising

IGN: ~KOREK

 

1. --Robert Recorde used this symbol to avoid the repetition of "is equal to" because it's a pair of parallel lines n one length

2. sexagesimal system is originated with the ancient Sumerians in the 3rd millennium BC, was passed down to the ancient Babylonians

3. Although the first set of rules for dealing with negative numbers was stated in the 7th century by the Indian mathematician Brahmagupta, it is surprising that in 1758 the British mathematician Francis Maseres was claiming that negative numbers

4. about 367 proofs !

5. 5 years after his death

6. if z = radius and a  height: pi * radius^2 * height = pizza

7. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz invents the Binary System in 1703

8. the Proto-Indo-European (PIE) numeral system has generally been thought to have been a decimal system.

9. from Old French géométrie, from Latin geometria, from Ancient Greek γεωμετρία ‎(geōmetría, “geometry, land-survey”), from γεωμέτρης ‎(geōmétrēs, “land measurer”), from γῆ ‎(gê, “earth, land, country”) + -μετρία ‎(-metría, “measurement”), from μέτρον ‎(métron, “a measure”).

10. pi day is March 14, because it's 3.14, about the same value as PI

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In-Game Name:THOR KINGDOM:)

GAME Name:ROYAL REVOLT 2

1. It was explained by the inventor that nothing can be more equal than the pair of parallels of one length.
2. It originated with the ancient Sumerians.
3. Liu Hui established rules for negative numbers in the 3rd century.
4. There are an infinite number of proofs possible.
5. Fermat´s last theorem was first conjectured in 1637. Andrew Wiles's proof of Fermat's Last Theorem was published in May 1995. So it took 358 years to proof this theorem.
6. If you have a pizza with radius "z" and thickness "a", its volume is Pi(z*z)a. It works because it has Pi in it, two the same characters to calculate the square of the radius and one more character for the thickness.
7. Gottfried Leibniz.
8. It came from the ten fingers of human hands.
9. The word Geometry comes from the Ancient Greek: geo- "earth", metron -"measurement".
10. March, 14: to be written as 3-14, which is Pi. 

           

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Game: Royal Revolt 2

Ign: Catalina05

1. The equals sign or equality sign (=) is a mathematical symbol used to indicate equality. It was invented in 1557 by Robert Recorde. The etymology of the word "equal" is from the Latin word "æqualis" as meaning "uniform", "identical", or "equal", from aequus ("level", "even", or "just"). Robert Recorde said: "… to avoid the tedious repetition of these words: "is equal to", I will set (as I do often in work use) a pair of parallels, or Gemowe lines, of one length (thus =), because no two things can be more equal."

2 . Sexagesimal (base 60) is a numeral system with sixty as its base. It originated with the ancient Sumerians in the 3rd millennium BC, was passed down to the ancient Babylonian.

3. Negative numbers appear for the first time in history in the Nine Chapters on the Mathematical Art (Jiu zhang suan-shu), which in its present form dates from the period of the Han Dynasty (202 BC – AD 220), but may well contain much older material. The mathematician Liu Hui (c. 3rd century) established rules for the addition and subtraction of negative numbers.

4. W.Dunham [Mathematical Universe] cites a book The Pythagorean
  Proposition by an early 20th century professor Elisha Scott
  Loomis. The book is a collection of 367 proofs of the
  Pythagorean Theorem and has been republished by NCTM in 1968. 
  Elisha Loomis, The Pythagorean Proposition, National Council of
  Teachers of Mathematics, 1968. This eccentric book was first
  compiled in 1907, first published in 1928 (at a price of $2.00!),
  and reissued in this edition. It contains 365 more or less
  distinct proofs of Pythagoras' Theorem. The total effect is
  perhaps a bit overwhelming, and the quality of the figures is
  very poor, but nonetheless there are a few gems distributed
  throughout. 

  The book The Pythagorean Proposition, By Elisha Scott Loomis,
  is a fairly amazing book. It contains 256 proofs of the
  Pythagorean Theorem. It shows that you can devise an infinite
  number of algebraic proofs, like the first proof above. It
  shows that you can devise an infinite number of geometric
  proofs, like Euclid's proof. And it shows that there can be
  no proof using trigonometry, analytic geometry, or calculus.
  The book is out of print, by the way. I'm not sure which number is right, but it appears that you can't 
count the number of distinct proofs, in any case.

5. 1993 - 1637 = 356

Fermat’s last theorem was stated by Fermat in 1637. Many, many crucial steps towards the final proof took place through the 20th century, however Andrew Wiles was the person who brought it all together to solve it starting in 1986 and finally showing his work in 1993.

The Taniyama Shurima conjecture was what Andrew Wiles had proved, which connected two far away branches of mathematics. (around 1955)

Gerhard Frey connected the Taniyama-Shurima conjecture, showing that if one proves the first they would incidentally prove the latter in 1984.

Andrew Wiles proved the Taniyama-Shurima conjecture and henceforth proved Fermat’s last theorem after working for many years under the radar.

An insightful book on the history of the problem is “Fermat’s Last Theorem” by Simon Singh.

6. (t/d)*r^6/(r^3-15)^2
t=time; d=diameter; r=radius


7. Gottfried Leibniz 


8. The decimal system should be a unique representation of any number possible. Thus making the number system created by Brahmagupta   with the addition of rules for zero by  Aryabhata the first decimal system as we know. The Sumerians and Babylonians created a number system with 10 digits but without a 0, which makes representing every number uniquely very hard.


9. Geometry comes from two Greek words, “ge” meaning “earth” and “metria” meaning “measuring.”

10. Pi Day is an annual celebration of the mathematical constant π (pi)

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Ign: theo cu Th

Game: royal revolt2

. Why is the symbol “=” used to express equality?
2. Where did the sexagesimal system come from?
3. Who made the first set of rules to deal with negative numbers and when?
4. Approximately how many proofs are there for the Pythagorean Theorem?
5. How many years did it take the world to proof Fermat’s Last Theorem? Specify the years and who finally reached the proof.
6. A very curious question, explain why a pizza’s volume can be calculated with the following formula: Pizza. Explain each part and why it works.
7. Who was the first one to fully document the binary system?
8. Where did the decimal system come from?
9. Where does the word “geometry” come from?
10. When is the Pi Day and why?

1. The equals sign or equality sign (=) is a mathematical symbol used to indicate equality. It was invented in 1557 by Robert Recorde. The etymology of the word "equal" is from the Latin word "æqualis" as meaning "uniform", "identical", or "equal", from aequus ("level", "even", or "just"). Robert Recorde said: "… to avoid the tedious repetition of these words: "is equal to", I will set (as I do often in work use) a pair of parallels, or Gemowe lines, of one length (thus =), because no two things can be more equal."

2 . Sexagesimal (base 60) is a numeral system with sixty as its base. It originated with the ancient Sumerians in the 3rd millennium BC, was passed down to the ancient Babylonian.

3. Negative numbers appear for the first time in history in the Nine Chapters on the Mathematical Art (Jiu zhang suan-shu), which in its present form dates from the period of the Han Dynasty (202 BC – AD 220), but may well contain much older material. The mathematician Liu Hui (c. 3rd century) established rules for the addition and subtraction of negative numbers.

4. W.Dunham [Mathematical Universe] cites a book The Pythagorean
  Proposition by an early 20th century professor Elisha Scott
  Loomis. The book is a collection of 367 proofs of the
  Pythagorean Theorem and has been republished by NCTM in 1968. 
  Elisha Loomis, The Pythagorean Proposition, National Council of
  Teachers of Mathematics, 1968. This eccentric book was first
  compiled in 1907, first published in 1928 (at a price of $2.00!),
  and reissued in this edition. It contains 365 more or less
  distinct proofs of Pythagoras' Theorem. The total effect is
  perhaps a bit overwhelming, and the quality of the figures is
  very poor, but nonetheless there are a few gems distributed
  throughout. 

  The book The Pythagorean Proposition, By Elisha Scott Loomis,
  is a fairly amazing book. It contains 256 proofs of the
  Pythagorean Theorem. It shows that you can devise an infinite
  number of algebraic proofs, like the first proof above. It
  shows that you can devise an infinite number of geometric
  proofs, like Euclid's proof. And it shows that there can be
  no proof using trigonometry, analytic geometry, or calculus.
  The book is out of print, by the way. I'm not sure which number is right, but it appears that you can't 
count the number of distinct proofs, in any case.

5. 1993 - 1637 = 356

Fermat’s last theorem was stated by Fermat in 1637. Many, many crucial steps towards the final proof took place through the 20th century, however Andrew Wiles was the person who brought it all together to solve it starting in 1986 and finally showing his work in 1993.

The Taniyama Shurima conjecture was what Andrew Wiles had proved, which connected two far away branches of mathematics. (around 1955)

Gerhard Frey connected the Taniyama-Shurima conjecture, showing that if one proves the first they would incidentally prove the latter in 1984.

Andrew Wiles proved the Taniyama-Shurima conjecture and henceforth proved Fermat’s last theorem after working for many years under the radar.

An insightful book on the history of the problem is “Fermat’s Last Theorem” by Simon Singh.

6.(t/d)*r^6/(r^3-15)^2
t=time; d=diameter; r=radius
7. Gottfried Leibniz
8. The decimal system should be a unique representation of any number possible. Thus making the number system created by Brahmagupta   with the addition of rules for zero by  Aryabhata the first decimal system as we know. The Sumerians and Babylonians created a number system with 10 digits but without a 0, which makes representing every number uniquely very hard.
9. Geometry comes from two Greek words, “ge” meaning “earth” and “metria” meaning “measuring.”

10. Pi Day is an annual celebration of the mathematical constant π (pi

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Ign:SGO.

game:royal revolt 2

 

1. The equals sign or equality sign (=) is a mathematical symbol used to indicate equality. It was invented in 1557 by Robert Recorde. The etymology of the word "equal" is from the Latin word "æqualis" as meaning "uniform", "identical", or "equal", from aequus ("level", "even", or "just"). Robert Recorde said: "… to avoid the tedious repetition of these words: "is equal to", I will set (as I do often in work use) a pair of parallels, or Gemowe lines, of one length (thus =), because no two things can be more equal."

2 . Sexagesimal (base 60) is a numeral system with sixty as its base. It originated with the ancient Sumerians in the 3rd millennium BC, was passed down to the ancient Babylonian.

3. Negative numbers appear for the first time in history in the Nine Chapters on the Mathematical Art (Jiu zhang suan-shu), which in its present form dates from the period of the Han Dynasty (202 BC – AD 220), but may well contain much older material. The mathematician Liu Hui (c. 3rd century) established rules for the addition and subtraction of negative numbers.

4. W.Dunham [Mathematical Universe] cites a book The Pythagorean
  Proposition by an early 20th century professor Elisha Scott
  Loomis. The book is a collection of 367 proofs of the
  Pythagorean Theorem and has been republished by NCTM in 1968. 
  Elisha Loomis, The Pythagorean Proposition, National Council of
  Teachers of Mathematics, 1968. This eccentric book was first
  compiled in 1907, first published in 1928 (at a price of $2.00!),
  and reissued in this edition. It contains 365 more or less
  distinct proofs of Pythagoras' Theorem. The total effect is
  perhaps a bit overwhelming, and the quality of the figures is
  very poor, but nonetheless there are a few gems distributed
  throughout. 

  The book The Pythagorean Proposition, By Elisha Scott Loomis,
  is a fairly amazing book. It contains 256 proofs of the
  Pythagorean Theorem. It shows that you can devise an infinite
  number of algebraic proofs, like the first proof above. It
  shows that you can devise an infinite number of geometric
  proofs, like Euclid's proof. And it shows that there can be
  no proof using trigonometry, analytic geometry, or calculus.
  The book is out of print, by the way. I'm not sure which number is right, but it appears that you can't 
count the number of distinct proofs, in any case.

5. 1993 - 1637 = 356

Fermat’s last theorem was stated by Fermat in 1637. Many, many crucial steps towards the final proof took place through the 20th century, however Andrew Wiles was the person who brought it all together to solve it starting in 1986 and finally showing his work in 1993.

The Taniyama Shurima conjecture was what Andrew Wiles had proved, which connected two far away branches of mathematics. (around 1955)

Gerhard Frey connected the Taniyama-Shurima conjecture, showing that if one proves the first they would incidentally prove the latter in 1984.

Andrew Wiles proved the Taniyama-Shurima conjecture and henceforth proved Fermat’s last theorem after working for many years under the radar.

An insightful book on the history of the problem is “Fermat’s Last Theorem” by Simon Singh.

6. (t/d)*r^6/(r^3-15)^2
t=time; d=diameter; r=radius


7. Gottfried Leibniz 


8. The decimal system should be a unique representation of any number possible. Thus making the number system created by Brahmagupta   with the addition of rules for zero by  Aryabhata the first decimal system as we know. The Sumerians and Babylonians created a number system with 10 digits but without a 0, which makes representing every number uniquely very hard.


9. Geometry comes from two Greek words, “ge” meaning “earth” and “metria” meaning “measuring.”

10. Pi Day is an annual celebration of the mathematical constant π (pi)

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Ign: Sir Costel

Game:royal revolt 2

1. Why is the symbol “=” used to express equality?
2. Where did the sexagesimal system come from?
3. Who made the first set of rules to deal with negative numbers and when?
4. Approximately how many proofs are there for the Pythagorean Theorem?
5. How many years did it take the world to proof Fermat’s Last Theorem? Specify the years and who finally reached the proof.
6. A very curious question, explain why a pizza’s volume can be calculated with the following formula: Pizza. Explain each part and why it works.
7. Who was the first one to fully document the binary system?
8. Where did the decimal system come from?
9. Where does the word “geometry” come from?
10. When is the Pi Day and why?

1. The equals sign or equality sign (=) is a mathematical symbol used to indicate equality. It was invented in 1557 by Robert Recorde. The etymology of the word "equal" is from the Latin word "æqualis" as meaning "uniform", "identical", or "equal", from aequus ("level", "even", or "just"). Robert Recorde said: "… to avoid the tedious repetition of these words: "is equal to", I will set (as I do often in work use) a pair of parallels, or Gemowe lines, of one length (thus =), because no two things can be more equal."

2 . Sexagesimal (base 60) is a numeral system with sixty as its base. It originated with the ancient Sumerians in the 3rd millennium BC, was passed down to the ancient Babylonian.

3. Negative numbers appear for the first time in history in the Nine Chapters on the Mathematical Art (Jiu zhang suan-shu), which in its present form dates from the period of the Han Dynasty (202 BC – AD 220), but may well contain much older material. The mathematician Liu Hui (c. 3rd century) established rules for the addition and subtraction of negative numbers.

4. W.Dunham [Mathematical Universe] cites a book The Pythagorean
  Proposition by an early 20th century professor Elisha Scott
  Loomis. The book is a collection of 367 proofs of the
  Pythagorean Theorem and has been republished by NCTM in 1968. 
  Elisha Loomis, The Pythagorean Proposition, National Council of
  Teachers of Mathematics, 1968. This eccentric book was first
  compiled in 1907, first published in 1928 (at a price of $2.00!),
  and reissued in this edition. It contains 365 more or less
  distinct proofs of Pythagoras' Theorem. The total effect is
  perhaps a bit overwhelming, and the quality of the figures is
  very poor, but nonetheless there are a few gems distributed
  throughout. 

  The book The Pythagorean Proposition, By Elisha Scott Loomis,
  is a fairly amazing book. It contains 256 proofs of the
  Pythagorean Theorem. It shows that you can devise an infinite
  number of algebraic proofs, like the first proof above. It
  shows that you can devise an infinite number of geometric
  proofs, like Euclid's proof. And it shows that there can be
  no proof using trigonometry, analytic geometry, or calculus.
  The book is out of print, by the way. I'm not sure which number is right, but it appears that you can't 
count the number of distinct proofs, in any case.

5. 1993 - 1637 = 356

Fermat’s last theorem was stated by Fermat in 1637. Many, many crucial steps towards the final proof took place through the 20th century, however Andrew Wiles was the person who brought it all together to solve it starting in 1986 and finally showing his work in 1993.

The Taniyama Shurima conjecture was what Andrew Wiles had proved, which connected two far away branches of mathematics. (around 1955)

Gerhard Frey connected the Taniyama-Shurima conjecture, showing that if one proves the first they would incidentally prove the latter in 1984.

Andrew Wiles proved the Taniyama-Shurima conjecture and henceforth proved Fermat’s last theorem after working for many years under the radar.

An insightful book on the history of the problem is “Fermat’s Last Theorem” by Simon Singh.

6.(t/d)*r^6/(r^3-15)^2
t=time; d=diameter; r=radius
7. Gottfried Leibniz
8. The decimal system should be a unique representation of any number possible. Thus making the number system created by Brahmagupta   with the addition of rules for zero by  Aryabhata the first decimal system as we know. The Sumerians and Babylonians created a number system with 10 digits but without a 0, which makes representing every number uniquely very hard.
9. Geometry comes from two Greek words, “ge” meaning “earth” and “metria” meaning “measuring.”

10. Pi Day is an annual celebration of the mathematical constant π (pi

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My game is Royal Revolt 2. My in game name is theJmtz

Answers:
#1 -  The inventor thought that nothing could be more equal than two parallel lines of equal length

#2 - It came from the ancient Sumerians.

#3 - Liu Hui established rules for negative numbers in the 3rd century.

#4 - There are an infinite number of possible proofs

#5 - Fermat's last theorem was first conjectured in 1637.  Andrew Wiles proof was published in 1995. It took 358 years to find a proof.

#6 - If you have a pizza with radius 'z' and thickness 'a', then it's volume is Pi*z*z*a. The formula for the volume of a cylinder is Pi * Radius^2 * height. So Pi * z ^2 * a or Pizza.

#7 - Gottfried Leibniz.

#8 - It came from the fingers of the human hand. We have 10 fingers, so it's a natural system invented by many cultures.

#9 - The word "geometry" comes from the ancient Greek root geo for "earth" and -metron for "measurement".

#10 - Pi day is March 14, every year. It comes from the value for pi which is 3.14 (159etc) and March 14th is represented as 3-14 in the US calendar system.

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1. It was explained by the inventor that nothing can be more equal than the pair of parallels of one length.
2. It originated with the ancient Sumerians.
3. Liu Hui established rules for negative numbers in the 3rd century.
4. There are an infinite number of proofs possible.
5. Fermat´s last theorem was first conjectured in 1637. Andrew Wiles's proof of Fermat's Last Theorem was published in May 1995. So it took 358 years to proof this theorem.
6. If you have a pizza with radius "z" and thickness "a", its volume is Pi(z*z)a. It works because it has Pi in it, two the same characters to calculate the square of the radius and one more character for the thickness.
7. Gottfried Leibniz.
8. It came from the ten fingers of human hands.
9. The word Geometry comes from the Ancient Greek: geo- "earth", -metron "measurement".
10. March, 14: to be written as 3-14, which is Pi.

Game: Royal revolt 2

IGN: loverboy e8

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1. It was explained by the inventor that nothing can be more equal than the pair of parallels of one length.
2. It originated with the ancient Sumerians.
3. Liu Hui established rules for negative numbers in the 3rd century.
4. There are an infinite number of proofs possible.
5. Fermat´s last theorem was first conjectured in 1637. Andrew Wiles's proof of Fermat's Last Theorem was published in May 1995. So it took 358 years to proof this theorem.
6. If you have a pizza with radius "z" and thickness "a", its volume is Pi(z*z)a. It works because it has Pi in it, two the same characters to calculate the square of the radius and one more character for the thickness.
7. Gottfried Leibniz.
8. It came from the ten fingers of human hands.
9. The word Geometry comes from the Ancient Greek: geo- "earth", -metron "measurement".
10. March, 14: to be written as 3-14, which is Pi.

game : Royal revolt 2

Ign : > Stark <

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1. Quotes from Robert Recorde: "to avoid the tedious repetition of these words: "is equal to", I will set a pair of parallels of one length (thus =), because no two things can be more equal."

2. Ancient Sumerians

3. Indian mathematician Brahmagupta, about 620 CE

4. 370

5. Andrew Wiles
   1993 (finished by Wiles) - 1637 (started by Fermat) = 356 years

6. If you have a pizza with radius "z" and thickness "a", its volume is Pi(z*z)a.

7. Gottfried Leibniz

8. India

9. Geometry is a word from Latin origin. “Geo” means earth or land. “Metry” means measurement.

10. March 14 (3/14 in the month/day date format) since 3, 1, and 4 are the first three significant digits of π.

Game: Olympus Rising

IGN: Tomaxolympus

 

 

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1. It was explained by the inventor that nothing can be more equal than the pair of parallels of one length.
2. It originated with the ancient Sumerians.
3. Liu Hui established rules for negative numbers in the 3rd century.
4. There are an infinite number of proofs possible.
5. Fermat´s last theorem was first conjectured in 1637. Andrew Wiles's proof of Fermat's Last Theorem was published in May 1995. So it took 358 years to proof this theorem.
6. If you have a pizza with radius "z" and thickness "a", its volume is Pi(z*z)a. It works because it has Pi in it, two the same characters to calculate the square of the radius and one more character for the thickness.
7. Gottfried Leibniz.
8. It came from the ten fingers of human hands.
9. The word Geometry comes from the Ancient Greek: geo- "earth", -metron "measurement".
10. March, 14: to be written as 3-14, which is Pi. 

game: royal revolt 2

ign: krishna735

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Hi again, all!

The event finished a few days ago as the deadline said and I'm finally done checking everyone's answers :)

In this post I wanna show the correct answers and clarify some points:

1- Why is the symbol “=” used to express equality?

Because there's nothing more equal than two lines. Some people actually got this question wrong because they answered why someone decided to create an "is equal to" symbol, and that wasn't the question, if you read carefully, you'll see that I asked why that specific symbol was used to represent equality.

2- Where did the sexagesimal system come from?

Very few people got this wrong, I counted Sumerians, Babylonians and Mesopotamians all as valid answers, and almost all of you mentioned at least one of them, so good job.

3- Who made the first set of rules to deal with negative numbers and when?

This was a controversial question, somehow it seems some cultures differ on the true origin of negative numbers, the most popular alternative answer for this question was a Chinese man who was called Liu Hui, I researched and he made some basic stuff, however the one who fully stablished a set of rules was Brahmagupta

4- Approximately how many proofs are there for the Pythagorean Theorem?

The correct answer was 367, I counted also some surrounding numbers like 370 and 366. Some answered 100 and I have no idea where it came from, the same for "infinite proofs", althought possible knowledge might be infinite so there are possibly a countless amount of proofs as some will be discovered later and some others will never be found, it doesn't mean that answer counts.

5- How many years did it take the world to proof Fermat’s Last Theorem? Specify the years and who finally reached the proof.

358 years, from 1637 to 1995 when Andrew Wiles' work was published, I also counted 356 and 357. Then almost everyone got this one right. Some people just answered "5 years after his death" and I don't even know what they meant, so nope...

6- A very curious question, explain why a pizza’s volume can be calculated with the following formula: Pizza. Explain each part and why it works.

Pi being the constant, z being the radius, and a the height, you can calculate a pizza's volume using the cylinder's formula. Almost everybody got this one right, except a couple of members I guess, I don't know what they were even trying to say.

7- Who was the first one to fully document the binary system?

This question was that specific so you wouldn't get confused, almost everyone got it right, it was Leibniz. Some answered old Chinese documents and some others mentioned other things, and even though they might have used binary numbers before, I asked for the full documentation. Oh, and I have no idea who Juan Caramuel is...

8- Where did the decimal system come from?

This was the hardest question of them all, due to this some people missed the chance to get all right, sadly some of the ones who this one right missed another question, so maybe this trivia was a bit more challenging than I expected. The question indeed looks a bit ambiguous, but if you try to figure it out you'll discard other possibilities of meanings, so the final answer was "from our fingers", that's it, as anthropologists point out, the original idea of using a base 10 system came from the amount of fingers on our both hands, they were the very first tool we used to count, just like kids do. I copy-pasted my question on Google and I keep getting a lot of results saying this and who where some of the first ones to use it and document it, the problem is most of you just answered that last part and that's not what I expected, if I had asked specifically the place where the system was made, I would have drafted that question differently.

9- Where does the word “geometry” come from?

Greek words for "earth meassurement". No problem at all with this question, it was very easy so everyone got it right.

10- When is the Pi Day and why?

March 14. Same here. All good.

And well, that's all I wanted to say, hope you liked the trivia and enjoy the gems when they arrive.

Take care and good bye!

- Karman

Edited by Karman
Missed some answers

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